This Website
Copyright ©  


All Rights Reserved


See These Websites Within Nichols Cap Guns:
The Antique Cowboy
Cap Gun Paradise
Toy Gunslinger
Piñon Collectibles
Turner-Nichols Service Center
Cap Gun Treasures
GrandDad's Toy Box
Jim's Vintage Toys
The Ten Gallon Hat
Cap Gun Toys

Get THE BOOK on the History of Nichols Industries







The Cowman 250 was introduced in 1960. Uncle Talley says that later the name was changed to "Stallion 250." This seems a shame because all of the Stallion series had been some of the finest Cap Guns ever made. However, the cheaper guns were being introduced.

This Cap Gun was a 250 shot repeater and used the standard roll caps.



TODAY'S FEATURED ITEM
ON THIS WEBSITE!

There are over 8,000 pages (including those from thumbnails—and the site is still growing!) on this website that will give you more information plus BIGGER PHOTOS!
Mattel Marauder Division Tommy Burst w/ Night Scope
CLICK ON THIS THUMBNAIL TO GO TO THE PARENT PAGE FOR THIS ITEM.
(then go find it!)
WE HAVE LOTS OF BRANDS OF CAP GUNS BESIDES JUST NICHOLS ON THIS WEBSITE.




PLEASE HELP!
(Thank you for some of you have contributed generously and have helped us stay alive!)
Normally I don't grovel and beg for money, but I am past that stage. Originally we had quite a few who helped us each month by contributing a little to our cause of maintaining this website. Not so much anymore. It's a trickle now.

ONE WAY TO CONTRIBUTE IS ALSO TO PURCHASE THE GLASS CHRISTMAS TREE ORNAMENTS AS IN THE AD JUST ABOVE HERE!
www.NicholsCapGuns.com/glassware.htm


See how many people have helped us one way or the other over 12+ years at:
http://www.NicholsCapGuns.com/contributors.htm

Hundreds of wonderful people for over 12 years!

Also...The Internet wants a "mobile-friendly" website and we don't know how to convert a 7,000+ page custom website over to a format where you can always read it on a smartphone or tablet. Even Google said that this is the largest "Static" website on the entire internet. But it's only a matter of time before we lose it all to "progress." I'm old, have only Windows 7 and my software won't load on a higher operating system, and I don't know how to keep up with these changes and am worried about losing it all. If you're an expert, please help by suggesting a sensible technological upgrade! No two pages are completely alike on this website. If I could redo 10 pages a day, it would take about 2 years!

I would ask those who are enjoying this site to PLEASE contribute at least a little to helping us keep it going. Believe me, even small contributions help! This is the only site where you are likely to find most of the Cap Guns ever made. The site will always be free to use, but it's not free for me.

YOU CAN CLICK BELOW TO HELP OUT!
(Contritubutions start at only $10, but you can make it more if you can afford it.)
(And we refuse to put you on a mailing list or sell your e-mail address.)
Thank you "History Buffs & Collectors"—Mike Nichols, Texas


This is an excellent photo and the gun was pretty good quality. This particular one is in MINT condition. Despite the age of the gun and the fact that it is toward the end of the series, they are surprisingly hard to come by, but are not too expensive.

Photo by Robert Nichols



And here is exactly the same gun, but this one is renamed the Stallion 250. It is a little hard to see, so I'll explain: the oval where it used to say "COWMAN" now says "STALLION" and the letters "250" are directly in front of that.

Photo by Bob Terry



Creating Gun Grips

Original patterns for grips
CLICK TO SEE
When grips for Cap Guns were made, they were usually carved in something that was "not hard." By this I mean wood or something softer than tool steel. Wood is also cheaper! Then they were placed on a vertical mill that had a cutting tool and a "finger" (a stylus?) traced the original pattern. It was kind of weird to watch this machine touch every little crack and crevice of the pattern and at the same time you could see the machine cutting into tool steel to make the patterns that would be used, like those at the right. After the mill was finished, then a skilled craftsman would make the final cuts and do A LOT of polishing so that the grips would easily release from the mold. (This is definitely a "non-engineer's description.)


This is the same basic gun, but you will notice that it has a star to the right of the word "COWMAN." The grip is also different. Probably this one was released under Kusan.

Photo by Robert Nichols



How's this for a big photo? The interesting (and puzzling) thing to me is that Uncle Talley called it the Cowman 250 in his book, but it only hints at the 250 on the card and certainly not on the gun itself.

Photo thanks to Chuck Quinn



We will be happy to list toy shows and the like (free), if you will please send them to me at: .
Should you have some nice photos and/or some text, please send them to me at: .

This Web Site Constructed by Syntropy Properties, Inc. © Copyright All Rights Reserved


This Web Site Constructed by Syntropy Properties, Inc. © Copyright All Rights Reserved














Total Visitors:

There are currently collector/s visiting our site.